One Book – Three Covers (or Most Complicated Release Ever)

June 25th, 2014

Yup.  Three covers, two release dates and it’s the same book.   The July book is in ebook only unless you are a Harlequin Direct customer in which case you already have the paperback version.  This book is the first of a series.  The second in the series, THE SHIFTER’S CHOICE, releases in December 2014 and is Johnny’s story.

Here’s the cover for THE VAMPIRE’S WOLF which is a link to buy…

The Vampire's Wolf, July 2014, Jenna Kernan

The Vampire’s Wolf, July 2014

Nice right.  This one is 229 pages and cost $3.82

But wait.  It gets more confusing.  The book is also released on July 1 the Harlequin Nocturne July 2014 Bundle and includes The Vampire’s Wolf and The Resurrectionist by Sierra Woods [Kindle Edition].  That is what they call a bundle or a two for one, in ebook only.

Here’s the cover for the July Nocturne Bundle which is a link to buy… 

Nocturne Bundles are two stories in one.

Nocturne Bundles are two stories in one.

 

This one is 430 pages, two stories and cost $7.69

But wait….there’s more.  This bundle also release on August 19th in mass market paperback.  This one is hard to find.  Here is the ISBN# 9780373606740.  If you search on Amazon under books it will come up.

Here’s the cover for the paperback version of the July Bundle which is also a link to buy.

Jenna Kernan, The Vampire's Wolf, bundle cover july 2014

July 2014, Nocturne Bundle in paperback is available August 19th

This is 608 pages and cost $5.49

As I said a very, very complicated release.  Some things are worth the effort.  I sure hope my readers think that my latest story is, too.

So pick it up on July 1 in ebook or July 1 in bundle ebook or August 19th in stores or….Oh, nuts!


 

New Book Trailer for THE VAMPIRE’S WOLF

June 24th, 2014

I’m very happy to showcase this short book trailer for my July 1 release from Harlequin Nocturne.   I went with black and white for that dark and dangerous feel and think the images and the music really nailed it.  Let me know what you think and enjoy!!

 Just click on the link to see the trailer

The Vampire's Wolf, July 2015

The Vampire’s Wolf, July 2015

 

 

 

 


 

Win a pre-release copy of THE VAMPIRE’S WOLF on GoodReads!

June 2nd, 2014
The Vampire's Wolf, July 2014

The Vampire’s Wolf, July 2014

Congratulations to the three winners of last week’s contest.  Two winners were from the UK and one from Canada.  I had over 1000 entries.

This week’s contest is all USA and I have SIX copies to give away.

This is to win a copy of my latest Paranormal at GoodReads.  The contest ends on June 23.  This paranormal romance won’t be in stores until September 1.  This is a giveaway of the US edition usually available to Harlequin Direct customers only and I just have three (6) copies.

This will be my last contest until August….GOOD LUCK!!

Here’s the link to enter.

Just in case you don’t win, the eBook version is available July 1.

Available in eBook now:

AMAZON Kindle Version

BN Nook Version

Available in September in print:

Harlequin Bundle – BOTH The Vampire’s Wolf and The Resurrections – Available September 2014

Good luck and please share the link to this contest!

Thank you very much!


 

Cover Reveal!

May 24th, 2014
The Vampire's Wolf, July 2015

The Vampire’s Wolf, July 2015

I am so in love with this new cover.  My watchful couple, the tilted angle, the barbed wire and that huge moon!  They all relay the tension and drama of this story.  The book trailer is up on my website at www.jennakernan.com.  Just click on the cover image for this story and you’ll see the back cover, the book trailer and also a really neat Story Behind the Story, which includes some behind the scenes information on my research for this work.

This title is available for pre-order now!


 

Love Locks

May 15th, 2014
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Redbuds in flower on Brooklyn side of the famous bridge.

I’ve been across the Brooklyn Bridge a time or two but noticed something new on this trip. “Love-Locks” have taken over many of the clip-worthy spots on the bridge. According to a quick web search, the tradition of fastening a padlock to a bridge began in Europe. These locks are usually a visible tribute to the endurance of a couples love and, when possible, the key is chucked into the river.

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Do you think Monty still brings Pippi flowers?

There are now thousands of these little tokens all thoughtfully locked onto public property. They are fixed to the bridge like remora to a shark. I am certain the love of the couples will endure, but the locks….maybe not. I’m seeing work crews with bolt cutters in their future. Some of the locks are etched. Many have initials and dates scribbled on them with a black sharpie. Some are carefully etched. Some confused couples have inexplicably clipped their locks to a chain-link fence at the ferry pier.

Love locks fastened to every available cable.

Love locks fastened to every available cable.

I’m glad to know what these little curiosities are and why they are popping up like the onion grass in my yard. How many locks can those cables hold, do you think?


 

Where do all those coup feathers come from?

March 3rd, 2014

Not eagles, but osprey, a sea hawk nesting on a man-made platform.

 

 

I’m working on a Western historical and as I was researching the various types of coup feathers, I found an entry on the process of catching the eagles.  Eagles are too clever to be caught with a snare or a bow.  Their capture requires more craft.

The process is fascinating.  There is elaborate ritual for cleansing and sacred rituals preformed before the hunt.  Then there is preparation for the trap which is a pit dug with only a knife.  The dirt must be carried away or you tip off the eagle to your intentions.  The pit is only deep enough for one warrior to lie on his back.  This image makes me think of lying in one’s grave and seems an act of bravery already.  Once the pit is ready, an assistant helps arrange the clever concealment of logs, dirt, moss and grasses.  Then the bait is laid using a flayed rabbit or perhaps the neck of a buffalo.  The warrior then waits.  When the eagle lands, the hunter reaches up from beneath the bird and grabs both legs.  Then he pulls it into the pit where the bird’s neck is quickly twisted. 

Can you imagine grabbing a struggling eagle without running afoul of its powerful beak and.  They should give a coup feather just for catching the bird. 

So that answers my question.  But I wouldn’t try this as it is illegal to catch or kill any bird of prey unless you are a Native American. 


 

Shovel, Write, Shovel, Write, repeat…

February 14th, 2014

I feel like I’m reenacting scenes from my stories WINTER WOMAN and/or OUTLAW BRIDE.  It seems my world has frozen and I have spent much time and energy chopping, scraping and shoveling snow, ice, sleet and more snow.

This lovely snow scene is actually my driveway. It’s under there somewhere.

Between bouts with the snow shovel, I finished my copy edits for THE VAMPIRE’S WOLF, a paranormal Nocturne that will appear in JULY 2014, with my driveway, I’d imagine.

Finally saw the sun and the blue sky today and the snow quickly dissolved from the branches of my red maple.

I also sent my editor a Valentine’s present, the revised version of my Christmas novella, coming in October 2014 in the Anthology titled, WILD WEST CHRISTMAS.  My story is titled, A FAMILY FOR THE RANCHER.  I just love this story and hope my readers will too.

I’ve put an excerpt up on my website for THE VAMPIRE’S WOLF, in my eNews page, so please do have a look and let me know what you think.

 

 


 

The Collision of Serenity and Deadlines

January 19th, 2014

January woods in snow

Publishing is made up of long stretches of quiet broken with brief intervals of frenzy.  This week is one of the frenzy ones.  I have been calmly working on my next Western historical proposal and feeling happy with the progress as my February 1 deadline inches closer. 

Then I somehow got caught in the crossfires by two editors both sending urgent requests for various important things that have deadlines that are not inching but running straight at me like a charging bear.  Suddenly my proposal schedule looks impossible because of all these budger projects jumping the line.

I’ve been three days at the questions for the editor and will finish today, then turn to the revisions, the cover arts sheet and then back to my proposal.  One by one, I’ll press send and deliver the next much needed electronic file.

But despite the flurry inside my office, the heating pad warms my feet and the hot coffee fills the air with a comforting aroma.  Outside, the birds dart to and from my feeder and the sun casts long shadows through the trees.  Inexplicably, I feel an irrational belief that all will all get done before the deadlines. 

Care to lay down any bets?


 

Morgan Library & Museum

December 8th, 2013

Can you walk into Donald Trump’s library?  What about Warren Buffet’s, Bill Gates or Mark Zukerberg’s private collection?  You might get in but you will likely leave in handcuffs.  Ah, but I found a library of one of America’s wealthiest men, now deceased, and it is open to the public for only $18 a pop.

Lured from my walk along Madison Avenue by a sign on a lamp pole that had an image of Edgar Allen Poe, I ended up checking my coat and laying down my crisp twenty dollar bill.  The bill had ironically been recently spewed from a Chase Manhattan Bank ATM owned by J.P. Morgan, Inc.

Jenna Kernan soaking it all in.

The Museum is The Morgan Library and Museum and the exhibit on Poe is remarkable.  There was the poem I memorized at age twelve in Poe’s own hand. 

It was many and many a year ago,

In a kingdom by the sea,

That a maiden there lived whom you may know

By the name of Annabel Lee; 

                                                                    ~Edgar A. Poe~

This museum began as a private collection of rare manuscripts by financier Pierpont Morgan in 1890.  He collected books, manuscripts, drawings and prints.  Mr. Morgan’s library was built between 1902 and 1906 right next to his New York residence on Madison Avenue and 36th Street.   I have to get me one of those adjacent libraries.  Now accidental visitors like me can stumble around muttering, “How is it possible I have never even heard of this place before?”

                                                                                             
Mrs. Dickens’ appears to have missed a spot on Extreme Cheapskates
by 150 years. She has conserved paper, if not her sister’s vision,
by writing both horizontally and diagonally on the page.

Meandering along, I ended up in a gorgeous library that has a page from A Christmas Carol on temporary display and the page is written in Dickens’ own hand.  It’s the scene where Scrooge finally comes to dinner surprising his nephew Fred greatly.  I studied the edits Charles had made, noticing where he had scratched out adjectives and substituted more active verbs.  The site made me smile.  It is a familiar dance for many writers.

Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol in only six weeks and he wasn’t even signed up for National Novelist Writing Month (NaNoWriMo).  Writers will understand the reason that in October he was in a mad flurry to complete a story in time to have the work published for Christmas.

The Morgan Museum has a copy of the manuscript on display this month.  Here is what they have to say about the exhibit (from their website www.themorgan.org )

A page from Dickens’ manuscript, A Christmas Carol

Every holiday season, the Morgan displays Charles Dickens’s original manuscript of A Christmas Carol in Pierpont Morgan’s historic Library. Dickens wrote his iconic tale in a six-week flurry of activity, beginning in October 1843 and ending in time for Christmas publication.  He had the manuscript bound in red morocco as a gift for his solicitor, Thomas Mitton. The manuscript then passed through several owners before Pierpont Morgan acquired it in the 1890s.

How is it possible that I have never been in this museum before?  If it were in any other city, I am sure it would be the crown jewel of the town.  I can’t explain why I never visited.  I am not on Madison Avenue often and when I am usually in midtown I generally visit the New York Public Library, but from now on I will be keeping an eye on upcoming exhibits and preparing to transfer another twenty dollar bill from J.P. Morgan’s ATM to J.P. Morgan’s Museum.

 

 


 

Artful Description

November 3rd, 2013

Bookstore browsers often look for white space in books, rather than blocks of solid prose.

I’ve been thinking a lot about my current work in progress, specifically trying to figure out how much description is enough to build my world and at what point to do readers have their fill and begin skimming?  I do not want skimming but neither do I want them wondering what the heck a character looks like?

Every writer weighs how much is too much versus how much is not enough.  The late, Elmore Leonard famously said, “think of what you skip reading in a novel: thick paragraphs of prose.”  He is right of course.  I do, did, will.  But I may take his reminder that, “I’ll bet you don’t skip dialogue.” a little bit too seriously.

Readers need to be grounded in a setting but expect not bored with unnecessary detail.  How much of a hero’s face, form and physical characteristics are expected for the genre and how do you work in those details so they don’t slow the pace?

I know enough not to drop an entire paragraph of description in a large chunk, like a cinderblock in the middle of a stream of your nice even primrose path.  What the heck is a primrose path anyway?

In any case, I’ve been paying special attention to how much description authors write and, more importantly, how and where are the descriptions insert it into their stories.  I’m currently a fan of the hit and run style.  That’s what I’m calling it.  The dialogue is rolling along and then-bam-the writer hits you with a two-sentence extremely concise, telling descriptions so rich that they not only give you a picture in your mind, they make their descriptions do double duty.  And then before you realize it, pow, you are back in action or conversation.

Here is a masterful description of setting by Kristan Higgins that conveys not just the place but the purpose and all in two well-crafted sentences:

Manning Academy was the type of prep school that litters New England.  Stately brick buildings with the requisite ivy, magnolia and dogwood trees, emerald soccer and lacrosse fields, and a promise that for the cost of a small house, we’d get your kids into the colleges of their choice—Princeton, Harvard, Stanford, Georgetown.

~Kristan Higgins, Too Good to Be True~

Here is a physical description by Susan Elizabeth Phillips from Call Me Irresistible:

Lucy’s elfin features and thick, little girl eyelashes made her look younger than her thirty-one years. She’d grown out her shiny brown hair since her college days and sometimes held it back from her face with an assortment of velvet headbands that Meg wouldn’t be caught dead wearing, just as she’d never have chosen Lucy’s ladylike aqua sheath with its tidy black grosgrain belt.

~ Susan Elizabeth Phillips, Call Me Irresistible~

Author Phillips manages to get a physical description and attire of a secondary character in here with backstory between this character and the heroine and in addition, she relays how the heroine feels about her friend’s choice of wardrobe.  I have to sit down, I’m so impressed.

Here is one from Julia Quinn from a novel in three parts The Lady Most Likely by Julia Quinn, Eloisa James and Connie Brockway.  Notice how Author Julia Quinn weaves dialogue into her description.

“I told you she looked like Botticelli’s Venus,” her mother said proudly to her father, after a fourth gentleman had commented on the resemblance.  And indeed, with her wavy hair, alabaster skin, and sea-green eyes, Gwen did bear a striking resemblance to the goddess as interpreted by the Italian master.

~Julia Quinn, The Lady Most Likely~

In addition to mixing dialogue into her description, Ms. Quinn also makes her description appropriate for the historical period she is writing and for that I tip my Regency bonnet.

All three of these examples highlight different methods of inserting description naturally into the prose.  None of these authors overstayed their welcome by rattling on and on over a place or person but all gave critical details with extra value by making their description do double duty.  And that is how it’s done!